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C-47B Skytrain “Luck of the Irish” C-123K Provider “Thunderpig” F-4 Phantom II

Bringing The Past Into The Present

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  • Sunday by appointment only
  • Closed major holidays

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What's Happening at Air Heritage
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6 days ago

Air Heritage Inc.

Have you ever heard of. Sawadee party suit? The Air Force Museum has a whole display of them and we have one for sale.

Party suits were a local and unofficial creation that arose in 1967 from the 357th Tactical Fighter Squadron of the 355th Tactical Fighter Wing, stationed at Tahkli Royal Thai Air Base. They created "special flight suits" in response to the 8th Tactical Fighter Wings' usage of black dyed cotton flight suits for social occasions. The use of these colorful, lightweight suits, popularly known as "Party Suits," was soon adopted by the Air Force flying units stationed at the large bases in Thailand. The tradition also quickly spread to units in South Vietnam and to a limited degree, other locations in Southeast Asia. Party suit usage was normally limited to flight personnel and those in direct support of flight operations.

Party suit colors were consistent within the unit and generally had some standard form of name, rank and unit identification. Additional insignia, unofficial patches (usually humorous) and other embroidery was purely up to the creativity of the individual. There were numerous local tailors near the air bases who specialized in making party suits and embroidering the many associated custom patches.

The light and comfortable suits were ideal in the tropical environment and were worn on-base only for special social occasions in lieu of official dress uniforms, which were not commonly used in Southeast Asia. The most significant social occasion was the famous "Sawadee" party. Named for the Thai language greeting appropriate for both "hello" and "good-bye," this party welcomed newly arrived personnel and bid good-bye to those returning home.

The party suit tradition, although superficially humorous, served an important role in Air Force organizations by promoting unit integrity and maintaining an esprit de corps under the most difficult combat circumstances, while being highly valued by those who served in Southeast Asia.

This piece of history can be yours for $200.
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Have you ever heard of. Sawadee party suit?  The Air Force Museum has a whole display of them and we have one for sale. 

Party suits were a local and unofficial creation that arose in 1967 from the 357th Tactical Fighter Squadron of the 355th Tactical Fighter Wing, stationed at Tahkli Royal Thai Air Base. They created special flight suits in response to the 8th Tactical Fighter Wings usage of black dyed cotton flight suits for social occasions. The use of these colorful, lightweight suits, popularly known as Party Suits, was soon adopted by the Air Force flying units stationed at the large bases in Thailand. The tradition also quickly spread to units in South Vietnam and to a limited degree, other locations in Southeast Asia. Party suit usage was normally limited to flight personnel and those in direct support of flight operations. 

Party suit colors were consistent within the unit and generally had some standard form of name, rank and unit identification. Additional insignia, unofficial patches (usually humorous) and other embroidery was purely up to the creativity of the individual. There were numerous local tailors near the air bases who specialized in making party suits and embroidering the many associated custom patches. 

The light and comfortable suits were ideal in the tropical environment and were worn on-base only for special social occasions in lieu of official dress uniforms, which were not commonly used in Southeast Asia. The most significant social occasion was the famous Sawadee party. Named for the Thai language greeting appropriate for both hello and good-bye, this party welcomed newly arrived personnel and bid good-bye to those returning home. 

The party suit tradition, although superficially humorous, served an important role in Air Force organizations by promoting unit integrity and maintaining an esprit de corps under the most difficult combat circumstances, while being highly valued by those who served in Southeast Asia. 

This piece of history can be yours for $200.Image attachmentImage attachment

2 weeks ago

Air Heritage Inc.

Can someone please make this for Air Heritage? ... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Incredible modeling!

3 weeks ago

Air Heritage Inc.

CHRISTMAS PARTY & BIRTHDAY PARTY (Ralph Zinkham’s 90th)

PLEASE MAKE YOUR RESERVATION EARLY!

Attendance is strictly limited.

5 December, 2020 Social hour starts 12, and lunch will be served at 1. Santa will still come and visit, probably around 2:30.

As usual, please. BRING A SIDE DISH TO SHARE.
The Schillig Boys will be making their famous deep-fried turkey, and dessert will be provided.

I’m serious about the reservation! Call now or leave a message with your name , phone number, and number of people in your party. If any of them are children, please tell us their names and ages so that we may ensure that there are gifts for everyone.

724-372-8888. THANKS!
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